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Screw Compressors

As Western Australia’s largest independent provider of air compressors, compressor products and services, Cleveland Compressed Air Services in Perth is able to provide our customers with the right screw compressors for their needs, taking into consideration their process requirements.

A screw compressor is a positive displacement rotary compressor, with two screw elements that are under continuous rotation. Due to the continuous rotation, there is very little pulsation of flow, which gives it a significant advantage over piston compressors.

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Transair Wireless Technology powered by SCOUT™

Transair wireless technology powered by SCOUT Technology helps you keep your system healthy and operating efficiently. TransAir Wireless Technology Compressed Air System Condition Monitoring – Engineering your success. Advanced Compressed Air System Condition Monitoring Having accurate, timely readings on the performance of your compressed air piping system can mean the difference between identifying a problem before it occurs, or incurring added costs for equipment repair not to mention lost revenue. SCOUT consists of a wide range of sensors that provide consistent and accurate readings for pressure, temperature, humidity, power, and flow. The system collects data so you can take the necessary steps to optimize your compressed air equipment and your system’s performance. The easy-to-use web-based interface also alerts the user to unexpected conditions that may damage components and equipment over time. SCOUT Technology puts vital information and analytics in the palm of your hand to ensure your compressed air system is running at optimum levels. Let SCOUT Technology MONITOR your Transair wireless technology compressed air piping system, ALERT you to system changes, and provide DATA that helps reduce downtime and increase productivity.

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The Importance of Air Compressor Maintenance

An air compressor is an expensive investment in any production facility. With frequent usage, especially in high-performing businesses, it’s easy to forget that it needs routine maintenance to function effectively. Like all machinery, after extensive use, minor wear-and-tear issues can occur. However, if these problems are overlooked, they can develop into major costly repairs. To avoid potential disruption and downtime to your business, we’ve put together a list of five air compressor maintenance tips to ensure the longevity and functionality of your compressed air systems. 1. Inspect and Change the Air Compressor Oil Not all compressors need oil, but if yours requires it, ensure that it has an adequate level of lubricant before operating.  Without compressor oil, your air compressor will operate below capacity. It can also put strain it’s metal components which can lead to machine failure. On hot summer days when temperatures soar, oil can lose its viscosity, preventing the compressor from delivering proper lubrication to all internal parts. During winter, moisture also can get into the oil, resulting in a thickened sludge that can cause engine damage. How to Inspect Air Compressor Oil To inspect your air compressor’s oil level, here’s what you should do: Ensure that all equipment is disconnected from the power source. Place your air compressor on a flat surface and remove the fill cap. Look for dirt or foreign objects and debris that might have gotten into the crankcase. Measure the quantity of the oil with a dipstick, which should not exceed sit between the bottom and top marks for the sight glass. How to Change Air Compressor Oil If upon inspection, you find that that’s it’s time to change the air compressor oil (or that your oil compressor has reached the 500-1000 hours of use mark), here’s what you need to do. Place a collection container underneath the oil drain cap and then loosen up the drain cap to allow the used oil to drain out. Once done, secure the drain cap with the use of a tool. Fill the crankcase with your manufacturer’s recommended oil, but only to the level indicated above. 2. Replace the Air Filter Using an air compressor daily means that the air filter will easily accumulate dust and debris, which will affect the performance of your machine. To change the air filter and maintain your compressor’s optimal performance, here’s what you should do. How to Change an Air Compressor Filter Make sure the compressor has cooled off and then remove the old air filter by unscrewing the filter top and base. Check the base for dust and other impurities that could have been trapped in between the crevices. Use a blower to ensure everything is removed. Attach a new filter on the filter base before screwing the filter top back again and securing the filter. 3. Manage Condensation in the Tanks During cold weather, droplets of water can be sucked into the compression engine. If a buildup of moisture is neglected, rust can build-up, the oil can become sludgy, or the compressor’s circuits may get damaged. Here are four steps on how to manage the condensation. How to Manage Condensation in an Air Compressor Ensure that your air compressor is turned off and is not attached to the power source. Set the tank’s pressure, ideally below 10 PSI. Look for the tank drain valve and open it to allow all trapped moisture to escape. You can also tilt the tank to let everything out. Once you're sure that all condensates have been drained, secure the valve to prevent moisture from getting in. 4. Change the Oil Separator When an air compressor has been used for around 1,000 hours, it’s time to replace the oil separator. Here’s how to change it. How to Change an Oil Separator Open the valve to let out any air trapped inside the compressor. Locate the separator and remove the bolts to loosen it. Remove the separator lid and be careful not to drop any objects into the system. Clean the surface of the lid as well as the housing. Don't forget to include the holes and the bolts. Replace the old separator filter with a new one and reattach the housing to the system. Use the right wrench to reattach the bolts and other parts. 5. Follow a Routine Maintenance Schedule It is important to ensure that you follow the air compressor maintenance schedule outlined in your user manual, including ensuring your air compressor is serviced by a professional at least once every twelve months. In addition, to maintain optimal performance it is recommended you also do the following preventive maintenance measures. On a daily basis, you should check the belt, oil levels and air leaks, drain the water in the tank, and lastly, check for vibration and other irregular noise. As for air filters, clean or have them replaced once a week. On a monthly schedule, inspect the belts, bolts, hoses, as well as the safety relief valve. Finally, on a yearly basis or at least after every 200 hours, check on the engine or service pump. The Air Compressor Maintenance Experts It is important you take steps to protect your compressed air system at all costs. Remember that by applying preventive measures, you can save time and money in the long run. To ensure that your equipment functions well, partner with a maintenance expert who can provide the appropriate air compressor service. To get started, consult the team from Cleveland Compressors.

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What is the Difference Between a Vacuum Pump and an Air Compressor?

Vacuum pumps and air compressors both have numerous uses in our homes and transport, as well as in an extensive variety of industrial settings. But what does each one actually do? And what are the key differences between the two? We have put together this guide to help you learn the difference between a vacuum pump and an air pump, and to decide which is the more appropriate solution for you. What Is a Vacuum Pump? As its name suggests, a vacuum pump is a mechanical device that is used to create a vacuum. It does this by moving gas and air out of a system in order to create a secure environment for safely moving or transporting liquids. Although, it is also sometimes used for moving or transporting gases. Vacuum pumps have numerous uses within the home, as well as in various business and industrial environments. For example, you can find vacuum pumps in: Washing machines Cars Aircrafts Air conditioning Irrigation and flood control If liquid has to be moved safely from one environment to another, there is a high probability that a vacuum pump is being used. How Do Vacuum Pumps Work? A vacuum pump creates different levels of pressure within “high” and “low” spaces in the device. Particles flow naturally from a high-pressure environment into a low pressure one so the “high” space empties, causing suction that creates the vacuum. There are several types of vacuum pumps available, which work in different ways: Entrapment Pump: Sometimes known as a trapping pump or capture pump, this uses refrigeration to cool air within a confined space, creating condensation. The liquid can then be removed. Another type of entrapment pump, known as an ion pump, causes condensation by using electrical fields. Diaphragm Pump: Highly accurate and popular for industrial usage, a diaphragm pump uses a pair of mechanical diaphragms, which increase and decrease pressure by moving backwards and forwards. A valve prevents any liquid from escaping. Momentum Transfer Pump: This creates a low-pressure region by using a rotating device to move air or gas from its inlet to its outlet. The vacuum is then sealed by a valve. This type of vacuum pump is also sometimes known as a kinetic pump. Positive Displacement Pump: This has two different cavities, one of which is wider than the other. It creates suction, which provides a steady flow of power. These designs give vacuum pumps a great degree of flexibility, making them ideal for usage in different settings and situations. What Is an Air Compressor? An air compressor pump is a device that takes the energy that’s in air and converts it into power. It does this by putting the air under pressure. The resulting power can be used to operate various machinery and tools. For example, air compressors are used to provide the power for: Home power tools such as drills, nail guns and sanders Brakes for trains and buses Gas station pumps Hydraulic systems Air pumps have such a huge range of applications that they have revolutionised how power can be used in manufacturing. However, they tend to be used to move gases rather than liquids. How Do Air Compressors Work? Air compressors can convert air into power in a number of ways. For this reason, there are several types of air compressor pump variations available: Piston Compressors (Reciprocating): This type of air pump operates similarly to a combustion engine in a car, using a piston within a cylinder. This pumps air into a chamber until the pressure builds sufficiently. Once pressurised, the air can stay within the chamber until it needs to be used. Depending on whether it uses one or both sides of the piston, a reciprocator pump can be single-acting or double-acting. Screw Compressors (Rotary): Rotary pumps, sometimes known as revolving screw pumps, use helical straws to guide the air into a chamber. They provide a continuous flow of pressurised air, making them highly efficient air compressors. They are also quiet to operate. For these reasons, rotary pumps are extremely popular in manufacturing environments. Centrifugal Compressors: This type of compressor uses a rotating impeller to produce a discharge of highly pressurised air. This process is called dynamic displacement. As it allows a continuous flow, it has a higher capacity than some other air compressors. It is also cleaner because all the parts that require oil are positioned at a distance from the airflow. All different types of air compressors have made the process of powering equipment far easier. Air compressors allow each worker in a manufacturing plant to work individually rather than requiring a centralised power source to drive all the tools. What Are the Key Differences Between a Vacuum Pump and an Air Compressor? Vacuum pumps and air compressors are very similar devices that often do similar jobs. However, there are a number of key differences between the two. It is important to understand these if you are choosing the system that’s right for you. 1. Capacity An air compressor has to store pressurised air, so different models have different capacities. Vacuum pumps, on the other hand, are simply moving liquid or gas from one place to another so they do not need a storage capacity. 2. Vacuum Strength The strength of a vacuum pump is measured according to absolute output pressure. The smaller the number, the more powerful the pump is. However, the strength of a compressor is measured by its ability to produce high compression requirements in the fluid. 3. Flow Rate The flow rate of a vacuum pump depends on the pressure at either end of the pump. By contrast, the flow rate of an air compressor depends on its capability for volume reduction. 4. Power Usage A vacuum pump typically requires a lot less power to operate than an air compressor. This means vacuum pumps can be thought of as more efficient. However, this depends on what the pump or compressor is being used for as each will suit different applications. Contact the Experts Today Knowing the difference between a vacuum pump and an air compressor is key when it comes to choosing the right equipment for the job you need to do. We hope this article has helped you to understand both options better. If you would like more information and advice about vacuum pumps or air compressors, please contact us by calling (08) 9452 3669 or submitting an enquiry – our expert team will be happy to help.

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Our range of air treatment products

Compressed air is widely used in everyday life, both in the home and for industrial purposes. Many commercial and industrial companies rely on compressed air as the energy source that powers up pneumatically operated equipment and tools – food manufacturing companies that mix up granular products, aerate liquids and render meat products being just one example. Because compressed air is used for a wide variety of purposes, there are different quality standards of compressed air, with each being suitable for different functions. These quality standards, commonly referenced as ISO 8573-1:2010, are divided into six different classes or levels, which are determined by measuring three contaminants, namely oil content, water vapour and solid particles. Here at Cleveland Compressors, we have a range of products when it comes to air treatment. Knowing what you’re after in terms of compressed air quality, as well as the purpose of the equipment, are crucial in ensuring that you have the right air treatment product for your specific needs. Breathing air purifiers As employers become increasingly aware of their responsibility to comply with International Breathing Air Standards, breathing air purifiers have become standard in some work environments where contaminants such as fumes, oil, vapours, gases, solid particles and micro-organisms are present. Our wide variety of air purification products range from simple respirators that offer basic protection against low levels of dust particles to self-contained breathing apparatus for highly contaminated environments. Compressed air dryers Compressed air purification equipment must deliver uncompromising performance and reliability, while also providing the right balance of air quality and low operation costs. Our complete range of compressed air dryers includes refrigerated air dryers, desiccant air dryers and membrane dryers that suit a multitude of purposes and uses. Compressed air filtration Clean compressed air is essential in such industries as food processing, electronics, health care, photography, dairy and instrumentation. To ensure that compressed air is free of both solid particulate contamination and liquid aerosols, coalescing filters are required. To meet our customers’ varied needs, Cleveland Compressors offers compressed air filtration products under the following categories: Coalescing filters (for oil, water, dust and vapour removal) Point-of-use adsorber filters (for vapour removal) High pressure filters Water separators Sterile air filters (for food-grade compressed air) Silicone free filters Vacuum filters Mist eliminators Filter-Regulator-Lubricator (FRL) combos   Gas generators We also provide a comprehensive range of on-site, on demand analytical and industrial gas generators and gas generation systems. Product offerings include nitrogen gas generators for industrial applications and analytical lab gas generators to support laboratory equipment and instruments.  

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Screw Compressors

As Western Australia’s largest independent provider of air compressors, compressor products and services, Cleveland Compressed Air Services in Perth is able to provide our customers with the right screw compressors for their needs, taking into consideration their process requirements. A screw compressor is a positive displacement rotary compressor, with two screw elements that are under continuous rotation. Due to the continuous rotation, there is very little pulsation of flow, which gives it a significant advantage over piston compressors. Screw compressors are ideal for general industrial applications, and they are also used in high-end applications such as medical air, power plants, oil and gas, etc. They are more reliable and have higher availability than piston compressors, making them the ideal choice for regular use applications. Here in Perth, Cleveland Compressed Air Services has partnered with premium and world renowned brands to bring our clients high quality, energy efficient screw compressors. Our screw compressors range includes the highly energy efficient, generation 3 S series from Boge (oil lubricated screw), the highly innovative and reliable LENTO series from Almig (oil free screw), as well as the Compact C and CL range from Boge (oil lubricated). Whether you are running a small workshop or trying to cater for the requirements of your manufacturing business, our product line will have the right solution for you. Do not go for unreliable and cheap compressors when your process is at stake. With our fleet of technicians that are available 24/7, you can be sure that when you choose Cleveland Compressed Air Services, we will do the right thing by you – every time. Our customers are important to us, and here at Cleveland Compressed Air Services, we pride ourselves on being solution providers, not just distributors of products. This means that no matter what your requirement is, we will always endeavour to provide you with the best possible fit from our vast and well picked portfolio. More importantly, all our screw compressors are manufactured in Germany, and are renowned for their build quality and reliability, both in local and international markets. Is your business located in Perth? Are you in the market for high quality, reliable screw compressors? Telephone Cleveland Compressed Air Services on +61 8 9452 3669 or fill in our online enquiry form, and let us help you find the right screw compressor for your process.

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A basic overview of different types of compressed air quality

  Compressed air is widely used in everyday life, both in the home (e.g. aerosol cans) and for industrial purposes (food processing, electronics, health care, photography, dairy and instrumentation), so much so that consumers often don’t think twice about it. When people sit down to a meal, for instance, the last thing they think about is the quality of the compressed air that was used in the preparation and manufacture of their food. Little do they know that many food manufacturing companies would not be able to function or provide consumers with safe, contaminant-free products without the use of clean compressed air. From an industrial standpoint, compressed air is often the energy source that powers up pneumatically operated equipment and tools, including those that mix up granular products, aerate liquids and even render meat products. In addition, they are widely used to convey materials and protect equipment or personnel. It is important to note that not all compressed air is the same. The quality of compressed air is actually subject to quality standards, commonly referenced as ISO 8573-1:2010, and determined by measuring three contaminants: Oil content Water vapour Solid particles According to this measure of quality, there are six different classes or levels of compressed air quality, depending on contaminant level and type. Contamination levels are obviously influenced by the type of air compressor that is used, along with the related compressed air filtration and compressed air dryer units. Typically, however, compressed air quality is divided into four groups based on usage, which are as follows: 1. Breathing air The most common applications for breathing air are found in hospitals or medical facilities, as well as for underwater activities. If you have ever been scuba diving, then you definitely understand the importance of having air that is safe to breathe, free of contaminants and that contains a certain amount of water vapour. On the ISO 8573.1 scale, this comes in at class 1 for contaminants or particles (i.e. there should be none of these present) but in classes 4 to 6 for water vapour. 2. Process air When manufacturing a product that will be consumed by humans or animals, process air is often used in the production process. Not surprisingly, compressed air that meets the standard needs to have zero oil or particle contamination, so food manufacturing companies or even drug companies require their compressed air quality to meet ISO 8573.1 class 1 or 2. 3. Power air Usually used in pneumatic pumps or equipment such as those used for sand blasting, for instance, the quality of compressed air used for these purposes tend to be a little lower than the first two types of compressed air mentioned above. For power air, oil droplets or water vapour might cause a bit of a nuisance, but it certainly isn’t life threatening. In order to not damage equipment and clog up filters, power air needs to meet class 4 or 5 of the compressed air quality standard. 4. Instrument air Used for pneumatic instrumentation purposes, the compressed air quality for instrument air needs to be higher than that of power air, and generally meets class 3 or 4 of the compressed air quality standard. This is not only to protect the equipment and instruments that it is being used for, but also to protect the quality of the finished product. Instrument air with a high level of contaminants could affect the quality of the product that it is being used on, such as in paint spraying, for example, or cause untimely instrumentation breakdowns, leading to lost revenue.

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Speak to us today

We know that your business looks for every competitive edge in a tough marketplace. Reducing the cost of energy overhead is a challenge and we offer quality solutions through high calibre products and services. At Cleveland Compressed Air Services, we believe that your success is our success. That is why we provide top notch solutions and support to businesses using our quality products, whether through purchase or hire. After purchase or hire, our stellar customer care draws from a nationwide network of manufacturer trained technicians, ready to serve you 24 hours per day, seven days a week.

Ready for solutions to compressed air or energy problems?  Please call us at +61 8 9452 3669, email us at info@ccair.net.au or contact us online.